Caribbean Coast, Guyana, South America

Guyana – Independence Celebration

Guyana 50 front

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guyana 50 back

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Detail from front of Guyana 50 banknote

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Detail from front of Guyana 50 banknote

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Detail from back of Guyana 50 banknote

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Detail from back of Guyana 50 banknote

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Detail from back of Guyana 50 banknote

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Caribbean Coast, South America, Suriname

Suriname – Beautiful Banknotes

Suriname, 5 Guden banknote, front, year 2000

Suriname, on the Caribbean Coast of South America, is a land of rivers.

The South, near latitude 1 degree North, borders Brazil and is dominated by highland rainforests.

The red necked woodpecker, featured on the beautiful banknote, thrives in these rainforests.

 

 

 

Detail from front of 5 Gulden banknote of Suriname

An artistic illustration of the beautiful forests of Suriname, home to our red necked woodpecker..

 

 

 

Detail from front of 5 Gulden banknote of Suriname

Butterflies decorate the front of the 5 Gulden banknote…

… and Vampire bats.

 

 

 

 

 

Detail from front of 5 Gulden banknote of Suriname

The Suriname Coat of Arms adorns the front of this 5 Gulden banknote.  The motto below reads Justice, Piety, Fidelity.

The two men lean upon the central oval shield and face two different directions.  They are Arawaks, indigenous people of Suriname.  The man on our left looks to the past, from whence ships, as illustrated on the left of the Oval, brought slavery.  The man on our right looks to the future, his arm resting on the half of the Oval with an illustration of the Royal Palm, the symbol of a Just Man.

 

 

 

5 Gulden banknote of Suriname, Back.

 

 

 

Detail from back of 5 Gulden banknote of Suriname

 

 

 

Detail from back of 5 Gulden banknote of Suriname

 

 

 

Detail from back of 5 Gulden banknote of Suriname

 

Amazon Basin, Brazil, South America

Brazil – Villa-Lobos, The Amazon’s Faithful Witness

Brazil, 500 Cruzados, front

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From wikipedia:  He was ….coming to terms with the conflicting elements in his experience, and overcoming a crisis of identity, as to whether European or Brazilian music would dominate his style. This was decided by 1916, the year in which he composed the symphonic poems Amazonas and Tédio de alvorada, the first version of what would become Uirapurú (although Amazonas was not performed until 1929, and Uirapurú was only completed in 1934 and first performed in 1935). These works drew from native Brazilian legends and the use of “primitive” folk material. 

The Musical score, “Uirapuru“, is mingled with the floating Vitoria Regia in this illustration on our banknote, such that it’s not clear if the music is background or foreground to the Amazon’s floating lily pads, for they are as equal.  And that “mingling” is depicted beside the mind of the master, as, perhaps, emanating from him; or perhaps, he is merely a witness of the Amazon’s grandeur, and his score is his faithful chronicle.

The keyboard, depicted on our banknote, is oriented unexpectedly, but, likely, perfectly.  For it is the Amazon that produces the music upon our instruments.  And, perhaps, it’s not so much that we create the music, as that the music is there, and it is discovered.

The piece was dedicated to Serge Lifar, the Ukrainian ballet choreographer and dancer, following his ensemble’s performance to the music.
The Victoria Regia is the 2 meter diameter lily pad of the Amazon, and the Uirapuru is the indigenous bird of jungle legend.

 

 

 

 

Caribbean Coast, South America, Venezuela

Venezuela – Look Alikes, Hyperinflation and Unconcerned Birds

October 29, 2013 100 Bolivares banknote, front, Venezuela
December 7, 2017 100 Thousand Bolivares banknote, front, Venezuela

The banknote on the left was issued in late 2013. The banknote on the right was issued in late 2017.  The denominations, bolivares, are the same.

 

The front and back images are the same.  The left banknote is more beige in color and the right banknote is more yellow in color.

Both banknotes have the numeral 100 displayed prominently.  The banknote on the right, however, adds the word “mil”, thousand, after the word “cien”, hundred.  The banknote on the left is 100 Bolivares.  The banknote on the right is 100,000 Bolivares.

At the time of issuance of the 100 bolivares banknote in 2013, it was equivalent to approximately 10 US dollars.  So that means that, at that time, 100,000 bolivares would buy pretty much the same thing as would 10,000 US dollars.

At the time of issuance of the 100,000 bolivares banknote in 2017, it was equivalent to about 1 US dollar.

That means that, in December 2017, it takes ten times 100,000 bolivares, or 1 million bolivares, to buy what could be bought for 100 bolivares just 4 years ago, in 2013.  Another way of saying this that the value of the bolivares has been divided by 10,000; or, yet another way of saying this, is that, the price of things to buy in Venezuela have gone up by a factor of 10,000, in 4 years.  Life today is ten thousand times more expensive then it was 4 years ago.  And, think of this, Venezuela has the largest known oil reserves in the world.  Why then, is it not among the richest nations of the world?

 

detail from back of 100 bolivares banknote, Venezuela (2013)

Said a man of old: “Look at the birds of the air, for they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns; yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not of more value than they? Which of you by worrying can add one cubit to his stature?”  This is natural Law.  Hyperinflation occurs when men make a mess of things.

image from internet

The birds illustrated on the back of our banknotes are Cardenalitos.  They are native to Venezuela in Parque Nacional El Avila and found also in verly limited surrounding areas.