Africa, Central Africa, Gabon

Gabon – 2000 Francs – Year 2000

Banknote of Gabon, front.

Our beautiful banknote can only be identified as belonging to the African country of Gabon, by the letter “L”, above the numeral 2000 in the bottom left corner.  If that letter had been “C” or “E” or “F” or “N” or “P”, it would be identified with one of the other 5 countries using the same currency.  Together, those 5 plus our Gabon comprise the CFA or Central African Financial cooperative.

The nations and their currency code, for the 2000 franc banknote, are as follows: C (Republic of the Congo; 1993-2002 issue); E (Cameroon; 1993-2002 issue); F (Central African Republic; 1994-2002 issue); L (Gabon; 1993-2002 issue); N (Equatorial Guinea; 1993-2000 issue); P (Chad; 1993-2000 issue)

The Map on the left is on the front of the banknote.  Notice that it is segmented into 6 parts, each with a dot.  This is a map of the 6 Central Africa Nations that compose the CFA, or known in English as the Financial Cooperation in Central Africa.  The countries mapped are, starting from the top and proceeding in a clockwise rotation, Chad, Central African Republic, Congo, Gabon and Equatorial Guinea.

The image on the right, selected from this website, highlights the 6 member countries in dark red, and their positions in the continent.

 

 

 

Debate continues over the present use of the French backed common currency in the 21st century as outlined in this January 2018 article in the Economist.

 

 

 

 

Currency of Gabon, back

 

 

 

 

 

Central America, Costa Rica, North America

Costa Rica – The Allegory of Coffee and Banana

Costa Rica, (1990), 5 colones banknote, back, featuring the mural “Alegoria”, also known as the “Allegory of Coffee and Banana”.

“Alegoria”, or “The Allegory of Coffee and Banana” is the name of the beautiful mural painted by Italian Artist Aleardo Villa in 1897. It decorates the ceiling of the National Theater in San Juan and has been cataloged as one of the ten most beautiful ceiling murals in the world. It was commissioned to illustrate the vitality and progress of the nation.

electric lampost, detail from back of Costa Rica 5 colones, banknote

The lamppost planted in the sandy beach may seem out of place, but it is an allegorical painting after all. But there was good reason to include it in the mural.

San Juan, the capital city of Costa Rica, was one of the first three cities in the world to have electricity, after London and New York!

One can imagine their civic pride!  Look closely and you can see people looking at it in admiration.

 

 

 

Coffee prepared for export, detail from back of Costa Rica, 5 colones, banknote

The produce of Costa Rica is marshalled for export to the ports of the world.

In the background are the masts of sailing ships of the old world are mixed with the funnels, or stacks, of the steamships of the new world.

The sacks are loaded with coffee beans, each proudly marked “Café de C. Rica”.

 

 

harvesting coffee, detail from back of Costa Rica 5 colones banknote

Women are harvesting coffee accompanied by girls and boys and men.

Notice the animals in the background whose strength assisted the arduous daily work.

Coffee was introduced to Costa Rica in the 1700s. By the time of our mural’s painting, coffee had become a major industry for Costa Rica, providing funding for young academics in Europe, the first railroad to the Atlantic ocean, and for the national Theater.

 

 

detail from back of 5 colones banknote from Costa Rica

Costa Rica was the first nation of Central America to plant and export bananas. Millions of bananas were exported by Costa Rica by the turn of the century, 1900.

The man in our mural is happily displaying a luscious bunch of bananas, but, unfortunately, he is holding them up side down! We might forgive our muralist, a brilliant artist living in Italy, and who, as far as we know, never actually visited Costa Rica.

The artist’s interpretation might be seen by some, now a hundred years later, as a something of a prophetic allegory in itself.  The prosperity supported by the cultivation of bananas in the late 19th century would lead to what some have called the banana wars a few decades later which turned the region upside down for a time.

For more stories from Central America on this website, click here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The ceiling of the National Theater, San Jose, Costa Rica.

 

Costa Rica (1990) 5 colones, front