Africa, Burkina Faso, Earth, Western Africa

Burkina Faso – 5000 Francs – Year 2002

Burkina Faso (2002) 5000 francs front

The capital letter “C” in the top right corner and on lower left area of our banknote is the indicator that this West Africa banknote originates in Burkina Faso.  This CFA franc is backed by the treasury of France and is a common currency for 8 West African countries.  These countries as of the date of this post are Burkina Faso, Ivory Coast, Togo, Guinea-Bissau, Benin, Mali, Niger and Senegal.

The artwork is striking and sets these banknotes among the most beautiful in the world.   The artist is Pierrette Lambert, who developed the art for numerous banknotes.1

In the background center is a uranium smelting plant.

Burkina Faso (2002) 5000 francs

On the reverse of our banknote we are treated to a typical local market scene.

Caribbean Coast, Guyana, South America

Guyana – Independence Celebration

Guyana 50 front

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guyana 50 back

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Detail from front of Guyana 50 banknote

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Detail from front of Guyana 50 banknote

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Detail from back of Guyana 50 banknote

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Detail from back of Guyana 50 banknote

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Detail from back of Guyana 50 banknote

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Africa, Guinea-Bissau, Western Africa

Guinea-Bissau The Glorification of Triumph

Portuguese Guinea was a West African colony of Portugal from the late 15th century until 1973 when it declared independence from Portugal as Guinea-Bissau.  The Glorification of Triumph is celebrated in this beautiful banknote.

Banknote of Guniea-Bissau, 1000, back.

The beautiful artwork on the back of this banknote is the allegory named “Apoteose ao Triunfo”, which translates from the Portuguese as, the “Glorification of Triumph”.  In the foreground are men and women and children bringing forth in celebration the bounty of the land.  And in the background, as if illustrating what is in their minds as they celebrate, are universal images of triumph and glory.  In the foreground, the man standing on the right is holding an arade, a classic farming instrument of the region.  Everywhere there is bounty.  In the lower right there is a chicken and a goat.  In the center foreground there are baskets abounding with the tropical fruits of the land.  Standing on the right, a woman is holding a basket of fish, while seated on the left, one is pouring a cup of nectar.  All the while, musical instruments are being played.

1000 pesos banknote of Guinea-Bissau

From 1975 to 1997, the peso was the currency of Guinea-Bissau from 1975 to 1997.  In 1997 Guinea-Bissau switched to the West African CFA franc.1

Guinea-Bissau is on the West coast of Africa immediately South of Senegal.  It’s complex coastline, as seen in the image2 at the left, with its numerous islands bays and inlets, was attractive to the early Portuguese explorers.  They claimed the territory and named it Portuguese Guinea in 1446.

Portuguese Guinea became a major export port for the Portuguese Atlantic Slave Trade.

Africa, Central Africa, Gabon

Gabon – Baobab

Banknote from Gabon, back, 500 francs

Antelopes grazing near the baobab tree is the illustration on the back of our beautiful banknote from Gabon.  The massive and amazing baobab is often called the tee of life.  It is thought by many to be the inspiration for the “Ents” in the stories of J. R. R. Tolkein.  The image on the left is a Kota mask.  The Kota, (meaning “united” or “bound together”), being several groups sharing a similar culture, fashion these masks and other figurines from wood and then frequently cover them with brass to increase their power.

500 francs banknote of Gabon, front

On the front of our banknote, the shepherd watches over his zebus.  Zebus are a humped cattle that thrive throughout the topics.

The banknote is common to the 6 nations of the CFA, Central African Financial cooperative.  The capital letter “L” in the bottom left corner is the sole distinguishing mark that links this to Gabon.  The other 5 countries have their own distinguishing letters.  The first two digits of the serial number, 00 (16579666) indicate the year of the issuance of this banknote.  The year of this banknote is the year 2000.

The artist is Pierrette Lambert. 

 

Africa, Central Africa, Gabon

Gabon – 2000 Francs – Year 2000

Banknote of Gabon, front.

Our beautiful banknote can only be identified as belonging to the African country of Gabon, by the letter “L”, above the numeral 2000 in the bottom left corner.  If that letter had been “C” or “E” or “F” or “N” or “P”, it would be identified with one of the other 5 countries using the same currency.  Together, those 5 plus our Gabon comprise the CFA or Central African Financial cooperative.

The nations and their currency code, for the 2000 franc banknote, are as follows: C (Republic of the Congo; 1993-2002 issue); E (Cameroon; 1993-2002 issue); F (Central African Republic; 1994-2002 issue); L (Gabon; 1993-2002 issue); N (Equatorial Guinea; 1993-2000 issue); P (Chad; 1993-2000 issue)

The Map on the left is on the front of the banknote.  Notice that it is segmented into 6 parts, each with a dot.  This is a map of the 6 Central Africa Nations that compose the CFA, or known in English as the Financial Cooperation in Central Africa.  The countries mapped are, starting from the top and proceeding in a clockwise rotation, Chad, Central African Republic, Congo, Gabon and Equatorial Guinea.

The image on the right, selected from this website, highlights the 6 member countries in dark red, and their positions in the continent.

 

 

 

Debate continues over the present use of the French backed common currency in the 21st century as outlined in this January 2018 article in the Economist.

 

 

 

 

Currency of Gabon, back

 

 

 

 

 

Caribbean Coast, South America, Suriname

Suriname – Beautiful Banknotes

Suriname, 5 Guden banknote, front, year 2000

Suriname, on the Caribbean Coast of South America, is a land of rivers.

The South, near latitude 1 degree North, borders Brazil and is dominated by highland rainforests.

The red necked woodpecker, featured on the beautiful banknote, thrives in these rainforests.

 

 

 

Detail from front of 5 Gulden banknote of Suriname

An artistic illustration of the beautiful forests of Suriname, home to our red necked woodpecker..

 

 

 

Detail from front of 5 Gulden banknote of Suriname

Butterflies decorate the front of the 5 Gulden banknote…

… and Vampire bats.

 

 

 

 

 

Detail from front of 5 Gulden banknote of Suriname

The Suriname Coat of Arms adorns the front of this 5 Gulden banknote.  The motto below reads Justice, Piety, Fidelity.

The two men lean upon the central oval shield and face two different directions.  They are Arawaks, indigenous people of Suriname.  The man on our left looks to the past, from whence ships, as illustrated on the left of the Oval, brought slavery.  The man on our right looks to the future, his arm resting on the half of the Oval with an illustration of the Royal Palm, the symbol of a Just Man.

 

 

 

5 Gulden banknote of Suriname, Back.

 

 

 

Detail from back of 5 Gulden banknote of Suriname

 

 

 

Detail from back of 5 Gulden banknote of Suriname

 

 

 

Detail from back of 5 Gulden banknote of Suriname

 

Indian Ocean, Island Nations, Maldives

Maldives – Beautiful Banknotes

The Republic of Maldives brings to us Beauty.  Enjoy!

Maldives banknote, front, 5 Rufiyaa

Cowrie Shells

Cowrie shells, illustrated left, were used as an early currency in Maldives.  An article on the use of Cowrie shells as money can be found here.

Coconuts

 

Coconut Palms are the national tree on the Maldives.  They grow in abundance throughout the islands.  A strange tale of their history is told here.

 

 

 

Kalhu’oh’fummi

The ship, the Kalhu’oh’fummi, was used by three brothers, Muhanmed Thakurufaanu and Ali and Hassan, in the liberation of the Maldives in the 16th century.

In 1558 the Portuguese established a small garrison in the Maldives and tried to impose Christianity on the locals.  I was still early in the era of colonialization.

The Portuguese rule was described in an Arabic chronicle as ‘‘a time when intolerable enormities were committed by the invading infidels, a time when the sea grew red with Maldivian blood, a time when people were sunk in despair…’’
In 1573, a leader arose, Muhammad Thakurufaanu Al-Azam and his two brothers to organize a revolt.

To bring an end to this, Muhammad Thakurufaanu, left the Maldive Islands for Maliku, an island about 440 miles north of Maldives, and now known as Minicoy.  There the three brothers built their ship and returned to Maldives determined to liberate their people.

It is said that he three brothers landed on a different island every night.  They fought the Portuguese during the darkness and set sail again into the ocean before daybreak. The Portuguese garrison had fixed a day for the forcible conversion of inhabitants to Christianity.  The brothers landed on that island, Male, the night before.  During the night they defeated that garrison and gained independence for their country, ending fifteen years of colonial rule.

The date is celebrated now as National Day.  In 2018, National Day is occurs on November 9.  The date varies with the Islamic calendar.

Maldives banknote, back, 5 Rufiyaa

Fishing scenes illustrate the back of this banknote.  As said by former a President, “Fishing is the lifeblood of our nation, it is inborn. From the soil on which we live, to the sea around us, it remains an integral part of our existence. Fishing, and our country and its people, [are] one and shall remain inseparable forever.”

The traditional fishing vessel is the “Dhivehi Odi”.  It resembles the dhow, a traditional Arabian sailing ship.  It is handcrafted in the islands from coconut timber.

 

For stories from other Island Nations on this website, click here.

For story tags, see bottom of this page.

 

Atlantic Ocean, Bahamas, Island Nations

Bahamas – The Beautiful

detail from front of 1 dollar (1992) commemorative banknote, The Bahamas.
front of 1 dollar (1992) commemorative banknote, The Bahamas.

The Bahamas issued a beautiful banknote commemorating the 500th anniversary of Columbus setting foot in the New World, which happened to be, The Bahamas.

 

 

 

detail from back of 1 dollar (1992) commemorative banknote, The Bahamas.
back of of 1 dollar (1992) commemorative banknote, The Bahamas.

In this map of The Bahamas on the left, the island group is shown, and the individual island, San Salvador, is labeled. San Salvador is the island accepted by preponderance of scholarship as the island upon which Columbus first set foot October 12, 1994.

 

 

 

detail from back of 1 dollar (1992) commemorative banknote, The Bahamas.

It was morning.  And we might imagine the sun rising distant and glorious, illuminating the paradise before those three little sailing ships.  It was October 12, 1492, Friday according to our reckoning.  Christopher Columbus climbed down from the Santa Maria, into a little excursion boat, rowed the short distance to the little island, and stepped ashore.

This pre-Industrial Age, pre-Age of Enlightenment, pre-Scientific Revolution, pre-Reformation, Admiral, armored and weaponed, with his fleet of three ships anchored behind him, and the monarchy of Spain behind them, stood before a handful of curious and naked inhabitants of Guanahani, for so they called their island home.

I cannot imagine a more fateful meeting in world history.

The record of this first day ashore is reproduced below.

 

detail from back of 1 dollar (1992) commemorative banknote, The Bahamas.

To be sure, the Bahamas are very beautiful islands.   Columbus reports seeing only parrots on his first venture.  And these parrots are beautiful as illustrated here on our banknote.

These parrots live in there island nations of the Caribbean Sea; the Bahamas and Cuba and the Cayman Islands.  Leucocephala Bahamensis are also known as the Cuban Parrot and the Rose Throated Parrot.

These beautiful birds gather in gorgeous flocks during the Winter, and then disperse into mating pairs from March to September.

 

detail from back of 1 dollar (1992) commemorative banknote, The Bahamas.

Phoenicopterus Ruber, or, the American Flamingo, is also known as the Caribbean flamingo, although it lives also in the Galapagos islands in the Pacific ocean. It is the only species of flamingo native to North America.

This beautiful bird grows to 4 feet or 5 feet tall and lives for 40 years, one of the longest life spans in the kingdom of fliers.

detail from back of 1 dollar (1992) commemorative banknote, The Bahamas.

Our Cylura Rileyi, or San Salvador Rock Iquana lives on three island groups in The Bahamas.  Our iguana grows to about 15 inches long and can be very colorful with colors varying from subspecies to subspecies and among individuals in a subspecies.

 

detail from back of 1 dollar (1992) commemorative banknote, The Bahamas.

The Coat of Arms of The Bahamas has a shield at center with the shining sun over the Santa Maria , the sailing ship of Columbus.  Overhead is a conch shell brimmed with five palm fronds.  To the left is a marlin and to the right is a flamingo, the national wildlife of the Bahamas illustrating its island nature.

 

 

 

The following is the record of October 11 and 12, 1492, from the Journals of Christopher Columbus:

detail from front of 1 dollar (1992) commemorative banknote, The Bahamas.

Thursday, 11 October. Steered west-southwest; and encountered a heavier sea than they had met with before in the whole voyage. Saw pardelas and a green rush near the vessel. The crew of the Pinta saw a cane and a log; they also picked up a stick which appeared to have been carved with an iron tool, a piece of cane, a plant which grows on land, and a board. The crew of the Nina saw other signs of land, and a stalk loaded with rose berries. These signs encouraged them, and they all grew cheerful. Sailed this day till sunset, twenty-seven leagues.

After sunset steered their original course west and sailed twelve miles an hour till two hours after midnight, going ninety miles, which are twenty-two leagues and a half; and as the Pinta was the swiftest sailer, and kept ahead of the Admiral, she discovered land and made the signals which had been ordered. The land was first seen by a sailor called Rodrigo de Triana, although the Admiral at ten o’clock that evening standing on the quarter-deck saw a light, but so small a body that he could not affirm it to be land; calling to Pero Gutierrez, groom of the King’s wardrobe, he told him he saw a light, and bid him look that way, which he did and saw it; he did the same to Rodrigo Sanchez of Segovia, whom the King and Queen had sent with the squadron as comptroller, but he was unable to see it from his situation. The Admiral again perceived it once or twice, appearing like the light of a wax candle moving up and down, which some thought an indication of land. But the Admiral held it for certain that land was near; for which reason, after they had said the Salve which the seamen are accustomed to repeat and chant after their fashion, the Admiral directed them to keep a strict watch upon the forecastle and look out diligently for land, and to him who should first discover it he promised a silken jacket, besides the reward which the King and Queen had offered, which was an annuity of ten thousand maravedis.

At two o’clock in the morning the land was discovered, at two leagues’ distance; they took in sail and remained under the square-sail lying to till day, which was Friday, when they found themselves near a small island, one of the Lucayos, called in the Indian language Guanahani.

Presently they descried people, naked, and the Admiral landed in the boat, which was armed, along with Martin Alonzo Pinzon, and Vincent Yanez his brother, captain of the Nina. The Admiral bore the royal standard, and the two captains each a banner of the Green Cross, which all the ships had carried; this contained the initials of the names of the King and Queen each side of the cross, and a crown over each letter Arrived on shore, they saw trees very green many streams of water, and diverse sorts of fruits.

The Admiral called upon the two Captains, and the rest of the crew who landed, as also to Rodrigo de Escovedo notary of the fleet, and Rodrigo Sanchez, of Segovia, to bear witness that he before all others took possession (as in fact he did) of that island for the King and Queen his sovereigns, making the requisite declarations, which are more at large set down here in writing.

Numbers of the people of the island straightway collected together. Here follow the precise words of the Admiral: “As I saw that they were very friendly to us, and perceived that they could be much more easily converted to our holy faith by gentle means than by force, I presented them with some red caps, and strings of beads to wear upon the neck, and many other trifles of small value, wherewith they were much delighted, and became wonderfully attached to us.

Afterwards they came swimming to the boats, bringing parrots, balls of cotton thread, javelins, and many other things which they exchanged for articles we gave them, such as glass beads, and hawk’s bells; which trade was carried on with the utmost good will. But they seemed on the whole to me, to be a very poor people. They all go completely naked, even the women, though I saw but one girl. All whom I saw were young, not above thirty years of age, well made, with fine shapes and faces; their hair short, and coarse like that of a horse’s tail, combed toward the forehead, except a small portion which they suffer to hang down behind, and never cut. Some paint themselves with black, which makes them appear like those of the Canaries, neither black nor white; others with white, others with red, and others with such colors as they can find. Some paint the face, and some the whole body; others only the eyes, and others the nose. Weapons they have none, nor are acquainted with them, for I showed them swords which they grasped by the blades, and cut themselves through ignorance. They have no iron, their javelins being without it, and nothing more than sticks, though some have fish-bones or other things at the ends. They are all of a good size and stature, and handsomely formed. I saw some with scars of wounds upon their bodies, and demanded by signs the of them; they answered me in the same way, that there came people from the other islands in the neighborhood who endeavored to make prisoners of them, and they defended themselves. I thought then, and still believe, that these were from the continent. It appears to me, that the people are ingenious, and would be good servants and I am of opinion that they would very readily become Christians, as they appear to have no religion. They very quickly learn such words as are spoken to them. If it please our Lord, I intend at my return to carry home six of them to your Highnesses, that they may learn our language. I saw no beasts in the island, nor any sort of animals except parrots.” These are the words of the Admiral.

 

For stories from other Island Nations on this website, click here.

For story tags, see bottom of this page.