Africa, Central Africa, Chad, Earth

Chad – 1000 francs – year 2000

Chad 1000 francs year 2000

The front of our banknote features the agriculture of coffee in central Africa.  The coffee flower in the lower left and the coffee fruit in the upper right, then the coffee picking in the upper center and the coffee winnowing in the lower center, all elements of the agriculture so important to Central Africa.  Our banknote is from Chad.  This is indicated by the letter “P” in the top right corner and lower left corner of the front of our banknote.

6 countries participated in the common currency known as the Central African CFA franc at this time.  The images are the same, but each banknote is marked with a country code. For the banknotes issued from 1993 until 2001, the country codes for the 6 participating nations were as follows:
C – Congo, E – Cameroon, F – Central African Republic, L – Gabon, N – Equitorial Guinea, P – Chad
For the banknotes issued in 2002, the country codes for the 6 participating nations were as follows:
T – Congo, U – Cameroon, M – Central African Republic, A – Gabon, F – Equitorial Guinea, C – Chad

The first two digits of the serial number identify the year of issuance. So, for example, the serial number on our banknote from Chad, above, is 0058189410. The first two digits are 00. This indicates that the year of issuance is the year 2000. Had the year of issuance been 1997, the first two digits would be 97.

Chad 1000 francs year 2000

The logging industry is featured on the reverse of this banknote from Chad.  Appropriate trees are selected and felled in the forest.  Then they are topped and delimbed and cut into transportable logs.  The image on our banknote shows five men, equipped with tools of the trade, guiding their prepared logs on the waterways of Central Africa to the preplanned spot where a transport truck is waiting.

The beautiful hardwoods from the equatorial rainforests of Central Africa are prized around the world.

Chad 1000 francs year 2000

The six participant countries are indicated in this map on our banknote.

Chad is at the top of this map.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chad 1000 francs year 2000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chad 1000 francs year 2000

 

Africa, African Great Lakes Region, Earth, Eastern Africa, Tanzania

Tanzania – 500 Shilingi

Tanzania

A Bountiful Harvest of Coffee is celebrated artistically on our banknote.  On the left is a broad view of a well organized farm.  On the right is detail of the coffee plant and fruit.  At center is a large coffee plant and at left the coffee fruit is being separated.

Tanzania

The zebra and giraffe adorn our banknote, and, at center is the coat of arms of Tanzania.

Tanzania coat of arms

The central shield bears four images from top to bottom: the enflamed torch, the flag of Tanzania, a crossed axe and hoe, a spear over a pattern of waves.

The shield rests upon the image of Mount Kilimanjaro.

The shield is surrounded on the left and right with the tusks of the elephant.

The shield is upheld by a man standing upon a plant of cloves, and a woman standing upon a plant of cotton.

Beneath them is the unfurled banner with the motto of the nation, Freedom and Unity in Swahili.

The giraffe looks out at us from our banknote of Tanzania.  We cannot see the totality of our graceful creature, but if we were to zoom out, we would find that we would have to zoom out more than for perhaps any other land-based living mammal.  Our giraffe is, likely, a Masai giraffe, the largest subspecies of the entire giraffe family, residing in southern Kenya and, our, Tanzania.  The Masai giraffe is also known as the Kilimanjaro giraffe.  As Kilimanjaro is the tallest mountain in Africa, so the Masai giraffe is the tallest mammal on the earth.  Our giraffe can be 19 feet tall, and, with its 6 foot long legs, can run at about 35 miles per hour..

The coat patterns vary among the various giraffe subspecies, the masai giraffe’s spots being somewhat more jagged than jagged.  It is believed that no two individual’s spot patterns are identical and thus individuals may be identified.

The Masai giraffe is generally found in Tanzania and Kenya and Somalia and Ethiopia.

Africa, African Great Lakes Region, Earth, Eastern Africa, Uganda

Uganda – 5 Shillings

 

Uganda 5 shillings banknote

The Ugandan Coat of Arms features prominently on the front of our 5 shilling banknote.  The coat of arms is backed by a map silhouette of Uganda.

Coat of Arms over map of the nation

The shield and two spears are said to represent the defense of the nation.  The three images on the shield, from top to bottom represent the waves of the Lakes of Vitoria, the largest in Africa, and Albert, the endless sunshine of the land and the historic drum calling to meetings of ceremony and significance.  The shield is above a green mound representing the fertility of the land, intersected by an image of the ever flowing Nile river.  The shield is flanked by two birds.  On the left (our right) is the crested crane, also the national bird of Uganda.  On the right (our left) is the Ugandan kob, emblematic of the abundant wildlife of the land of Uganda.  The banner reads “For God and for my Country”, the national motto.

Uganda 5 shillings banknote

The reverse of our 5 shillings banknote features a woman harvesting a rich crop of coffee beans.  It has appeared on several Ugandan banknotes.

 

Africa, Central Africa, Democratic Republic of the Congo

Democratic Republic of the Congo – 1997

Congo banknote, 1997, back, 1 centime. Nyiragongo volcano and arabic coffee are featured on the back of this 1997 Congo banknote.

 

Congo banknote, 1997, front, 1 centime. The coffee harvesters are featured on the front of this banknote from the Congo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arabian Peninsula, Asia, Southwest Asia, Yemen

Yemen – The Great Dam of Ma’rib (10 rial banknote)

 

Yemen 10 rials banknote, back, featuring the great dam of Ma’rib

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Great Dam of Ma’rib was built almost three thousand years ago and is considered one of the great engineering projects of the ancient world.

Yemen 10 rials front (3)
The great Dam of Ma’rib. detail from back of 10 rial banknote. Yemen

The medieval Arab geographer Yāqūt al-Ḥamawī described the great dam of Ma’rib: “It is between three mountains, and the flood waters all flow to the one location, and because of that the water only discharges in one direction; and the ancients blocked that place with hard rocks and lead. The water from springs gathers there as well as floodwater, collecting behind the dam like a sea. Whenever they wanted to they could irrigate their crops from it, by just letting out however much water they needed from sluice gates; once they had used enough they would close the gates again as they pleased.” reference.

Ancient culvert and the Shaharah bridge. Detail from back of 100 rial banknote, Yemen

According to Arab tradition, the city Ma’rib was founded by Shem, son of Noah, a thousand years previous. With 1000 miles of coastline on the Red Sea and the Arabian Sea, it flourished as a center of trade reaching from the Mediterranean to India. Agriculture flourished in large part due to its amazing irrigation systems consisting of water tunnels in mountains, and dams. Yemen’ spices, frankincense and myrrh, were traded throughout the world. Modern scholarship says the renowned Queen of Sheba came from the kingdom of Saba, centered around the oasis of Ma’rib.

 

 

Arabian Coffee berries on a branch, detail from back of 10 rial banknote, Yemen

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yemen, 10 rial banknote, front. Qubbat Al-Bakiliyah Mosque (Al-Bakiriya, Al-Baqiliyah, al-Bakiriyya) in Sana’a.

 

 

Central America, Costa Rica, North America

Costa Rica – The Allegory of Coffee and Banana

Costa Rica, (1990), 5 colones banknote, back, featuring the mural “Alegoria”, also known as the “Allegory of Coffee and Banana”.

“Alegoria”, or “The Allegory of Coffee and Banana” is the name of the beautiful mural painted by Italian Artist Aleardo Villa in 1897. It decorates the ceiling of the National Theater in San Juan and has been cataloged as one of the ten most beautiful ceiling murals in the world. It was commissioned to illustrate the vitality and progress of the nation.

electric lampost, detail from back of Costa Rica 5 colones, banknote

The lamppost planted in the sandy beach may seem out of place, but it is an allegorical painting after all. But there was good reason to include it in the mural.

San Juan, the capital city of Costa Rica, was one of the first three cities in the world to have electricity, after London and New York!

One can imagine their civic pride!  Look closely and you can see people looking at it in admiration.

 

 

 

Coffee prepared for export, detail from back of Costa Rica, 5 colones, banknote

The produce of Costa Rica is marshalled for export to the ports of the world.

In the background are the masts of sailing ships of the old world are mixed with the funnels, or stacks, of the steamships of the new world.

The sacks are loaded with coffee beans, each proudly marked “Café de C. Rica”.

 

 

harvesting coffee, detail from back of Costa Rica 5 colones banknote

Women are harvesting coffee accompanied by girls and boys and men.

Notice the animals in the background whose strength assisted the arduous daily work.

Coffee was introduced to Costa Rica in the 1700s. By the time of our mural’s painting, coffee had become a major industry for Costa Rica, providing funding for young academics in Europe, the first railroad to the Atlantic ocean, and for the national Theater.

 

 

detail from back of 5 colones banknote from Costa Rica

Costa Rica was the first nation of Central America to plant and export bananas. Millions of bananas were exported by Costa Rica by the turn of the century, 1900.

The man in our mural is happily displaying a luscious bunch of bananas, but, unfortunately, he is holding them up side down! We might forgive our muralist, a brilliant artist living in Italy, and who, as far as we know, never actually visited Costa Rica.

The artist’s interpretation might be seen by some, now a hundred years later, as a something of a prophetic allegory in itself.  The prosperity supported by the cultivation of bananas in the late 19th century would lead to what some have called the banana wars a few decades later which turned the region upside down for a time.

For more stories from Central America on this website, click here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The ceiling of the National Theater, San Jose, Costa Rica.

 

Costa Rica (1990) 5 colones, front
Africa, African Great Lakes Region, Eastern Africa, Rwanda

Rwanda 1980s francs

Rwanda (1988) 5000 francs, front

Coffee in Rwanda has been a significant industry both before and after the infamous 1990s.  Coffee crops were encouraged by Germany during their colonial period in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.  Rwanda came under Belgian colonial influence following WWI and coffee growing was systematized.  Coffee has continued as a prime industry for Rwandans since their 1961 independence and is a key part of their economic rejuvenation in the 21st century.

The banknote above illustrates the coffee plant, a family working the coffee fields in one of the numerous small plantations in this “land of a thousand hills”, and a woman carrying the harvested coffee.

Rwanda (1988) 5000 francs, back

The back of the currency is an illustration from the Rwandan countryside.  Banana trees are shown on the left and lake Kivu and hills are shown on the right.

 

 

Rwanda 5000 francs 1988 reverse (2)
detail from the back of Rwanda (1988) 5000 franc banknote

Lake Kivu, one of the African Great Lakes, covers approximately 1000 square miles.

 

 

 

Rwanda (1988) 1000 francs, front

 

Watutsi warriors are illustrated on the front of the 1000 franc banknote.

The Coat of arms from independence until the 21st century is on the bottom left.  “Republique Rwandaise – Liberte’ – Cooperation – Progress”.

The Coat of arms was restyled in 2001, after the genocide of the 1990s.

detail showing Watutsi warriors

The Watutsi, also known as Tutsi, were victimized by the Hutus in the genocide of 1994, but the hostilities went both ways for decades, whereas the animosity was ultimately but a century old.  The Germans appear to have developed the so-called racial distinction between the Tutsi and the Hutu during their brief colonial enterprise, favoring the minority Tutsi for administrative positions.  The distinction appears to have been only a hypothesis as no archaeological, historical nor even linguistic distinctions have been discovered since to support the distinction.  The Belgians relied upon existing the Tutsi administrating structure as they commenced their colonial administration following WWI.  Their rule reinforced the ethnic divide.  In 1931, during the time of the eugenics movement in Europe and the United States, an ethnic identity card was issued for each Rwandan.

Click here for more stories from the African Great Lakes Region.

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Rwanda (1988) 1000 francs, back

Eastern Gorillas and canoes on lake Kivu are illustrated on the reverse of this 1988 1000 franc Rwandan banknote.

 

 

 

 

detail showing Eastern Gorillas on back of Rwanda (1988) 1000 francs banknote

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

detail of Zebra on back of Rwanda 100 franc banknote (1989)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rwanda (1989) 1000 francs, back

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rwanda (1989) 100 francs, front